What is Google Analytics user flow (user flow)?

Do you know what users are doing on your website?

The flow of a page in a website from the inflow to the exit is the user flow (user flow). Knowing what users are doing on your site is the first step in improving your site, so it ’s imperative for web professionals to keep user flow low.

Here, we will introduce how to use Google Analytics to check the user flow (user flow) and a tool to check the user flow (user flow) more easily.

1. How to check user traffic flow with Google Analytics

With Google Analytics, you can see the user traffic flow for the entire site and the detailed user traffic flow before and after each page.

① Check the user flow of the entire site with the user flow

After logging in to Google Analytics,

1. Click [User> User Flow]
Google Analytics user flow screen

The leftmost side is the source of the inflow, and you can see the page that the user who entered the site went through.

② Check the user flow of each page in the navigation summary

1. Click [Action> Site Content> All Pages]
2.Click the page you care about
Google Analytics "Behavior" Report
3. Click [Navigation Summary]
4. You can check the transition source / destination of the selected page and the number of transitions
Confirmation screen of transition source / destination / transition number of Google Analytics

In the Google Analytics navigation summary , you can check the number of transitions before and after each page, but it takes a lot of time to switch the page you want to check, actually access the URL of that page and check the contents of the page I will.

2. How to visualize user flow in Anatomy

The access analysis tool "Anatomy" that "visualizes" Google Analytics visualizes the number of transitions before and after the page, which corresponds to the "Navigation Summary" of Google Analytics.

By focusing on the flow before and after each page instead of the entire action flow, each page can be visually grasped as to which page is likely to transition and where it is likely to flow.

It is very easy to check the user flow in Anatomy. Just click on the tile that represents a page and you can see an animation of the user's flow through that page.

When you click a tile once, a blue number is displayed on the clicked page icon (①) and a red number is displayed on the surrounding page icons (②). The blue characters are the total value of the transition. The surrounding red letters are the numbers that actually transitioned from the page you clicked.

Confirmation screen of transition destination and number of transitions with access analysis tool "Anatomy"

If you click the tile twice, a red number will be displayed on the page icon (①) you clicked, and a blue number will be displayed on the surrounding page icons (②). Red text is the total value of the transition from other pages. The surrounding blue characters are the numbers that actually transitioned to the page you clicked.

Confirmation screen of transition source in access analysis tool "Anatomy"

Pages with many transitions can be confirmed by ranking along with the screen design . By clicking the screen capture of a page with many transitions, you can switch to flow line analysis for that page. By repeating this, it is possible to analyze the traffic flow from the user's point of view as if the user actually switches the page while looking at the site.

In this way, anatomy is a tool that can analyze user flow while relive user tracking by grasping the transition of the user while comparing it with the actual screen.

Conclusion

In order to improve the site and increase the conversion rate, it is necessary to analyze the user flow from the user's point of view and find out the problems on the page. Please try "Anatomy", a tool that can analyze the user's flow while comparing it with the actual screen.

If you have any concerns about Google Analytics settings, such as the inability to measure the number of transitions between specific pages, a service that can diagnose the settings of Google Analytics is also included.

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